Hearing Loss

July 8, 2016 in Our News & Bulletins by Uptown HC

1,984 retirees were used in this study. All were generally healthy with no cognitive impairment. Hearing tests were administered to the group and 60% were found to have some degree of hearing loss. The researchers periodically gave the group cognitive tests as well over the course of six years. The people who were hearing impaired were 24% more likely to have problems with their thinking and memory skills than those with normal hearing. On average, these cognitive problems developed three years sooner in the hearing impaired group as well. Another factor not tested in this study was if the use of hearing aids or other rehabilitative treatments would improve cognitive decline.

Source: Lin F, Yaffe K, Xia J, et al. Hearing loss and cognitive decline in older adults. JAMA Internal Medicine. 2013 Feb 25; 173 (4): 293-299.

Hearing Loss

 

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